Lionfish

Lionfish

Lionfish, also known as zebrafish, firefish, turkeyfish, or butterfly-cod are native to the Indo-Pacific, but have become established along the southeast coastal regions of the United States, the Caribbean, and various other parts of the Gulf of Mexico.  Since Lionfish are not native to these waters, they have very few predators.  Lionfish are carnivores and feed on small fish and crustaceans, with a typical diet that includes popular reef fish such as snapper and grouper.

Bonefish

Bonefish

Bonefish are one of the most recreationally fish for species in the world.  Found in nearly all the warm, shallow waters in the tropics.  The most common places are the Florida Keys, Bahama's, and the Caribbean.The species can be very elusive, and very predictable.  They are always in the mood to eat and take a fly, which makes them a commonly targeted species for fly fisherman.

Redfish (Red Drum)

Redfish (Red Drum)

The Redfish is arguably the most popular coastal salt water fly-rod fish in the United States.   They are not as exciting as Tarpon, or as elusive as a bonefish, but they are easily accessible and fun to catch.  Even though they fight strongly, Redfish under 15 pounds or so can be landed with virtually any fly-rod.

Brown Trout

Brown Trout

Fishing Tips:  Young Brown Trout feed mostly on aquatic insects, small crayfish and minnows.  Adults will feed on fish, crayfish, rodents, and salamanders.  Large browns tend to feed during low light conditions and after dark.  Typical trout baits and lures work for Brown Trout, but slightly larger tackle may help catch trophy sized fish.

Rainbow Trout

Rainbow Trout

Fishing Tips:  Rainbow Trout eat insects, crayfish, fish, and fish eggs. They are susceptible to a wide variety of tackle.  Fly-fishing with streamers, wet and dry flies can be effective. Spinning and bait casting tackle includes small spinners, spoons, worms, and hellgramites.

Brook Trout

Brook Trout

Fishing Tips:  Brook Trout are aggressive feeders eating insects, crayfish, salamanders, and other fish.  Food is typically in short supply in headwater streams so Brook Trout rely heavily on prey that falls into the stream (e.g., ants, caterpillars, inchworms).